Preacher man since he was a boy

Michael Banks
3 min readOct 6, 2021

West Columbia’s Jackson wonders why God chose him

The Rev. Charles Jackson is shown at Brookland Baptist Church in West Columbia, SC. (Photo by Milton Morris)

It’s fitting one of the Rev. Charles Jackson’s favorite Bible stories has to do with the boy who offers his lunch of a few fishes and slices of bread to Christ, who multiplies the offering and feeds thousands.

Ever since he was just a child some six decades ago, Jackson has been bringing the word of God to thousands of South Carolinians and building his church into one of the Midlands’ largest.

He’s often wondered why God chose him?

“It’s a tremendous mystery. I didn’t choose it. It chose me.”

What makes his story even more special is that all 50 years have come at Brookland Baptist, the church in West Columbia where he grew up.

Jackson got his start presiding over funerals for his neighbors’ dogs and cats. He preached his first sermon when he was just 9 years old. He was licensed to preach a year later and eventually became pastor at Brookland at 18.

“Maybe, like Jeremiah, God called me from my mother’s womb.”

His mother, Ezella Rumph Jackson, died of cancer when he was just 16. Jackson admits her death caused him to question his faith.

“I couldn’t understand why God would take my mother, a devout Christian. That was very painful. God disappointed me greatly.”

Jackson made peace studying the story of Job.

“Even though Job wrestled and struggled with the inexplicable mystery of God, he never gave up. Because he did not give up on God, God did not give up on him.”

Jackson believes God’s kept him in West Columbia to raise the next generation of believers and build bridges between those of different races and beliefs. He recently delivered a message of love to 75 high school seniors and juniors representing the 17 electric cooperatives across South Carolina.

Jackson downplays his story.

“May the service I give speak for me,” he says, repeating a favorite gospel hymn. “That’s all. May I rest in my grave and nothing be said. May the work I’ve done speak for me.”

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